Military Service

US Army emblemIn 1991 I volunteered for the ROTC at university.  The program led to becoming an Officer in the US Army as well as obtaining an Associates degree in Military Science.

Commissioned officers generally receive training as leadership and management generalists, in addition to training relating to their specific military occupational specialty or function in the military. Many advanced militaries require university degrees as a prerequisite for commissioning, even from the enlisted ranks.

My program term, or mission set, was scheduled to graduate in 1992 which happened to be just after Desert Storm.

After taking training to become a combat arms Lieutenant II, trained in Infantry, Armor, and Airborne certified, I was part of the RIF that year.

Reserve units near me closed and the only option was an Aviation unit that required me to enlist in piloting and committing to 7 years before being trained and another 10 afterwards.  I declined.


Australian RappellingTaught Australian Abseiling (a.k.a. Australian rappelling, Rap Jumping, Angel Jumping or deepelling) is the process of descending a fixed rope in a standing position while facing the ground.

The technique is used as a military “assault” technique whereby a soldier is belayed, allowing them to face down the descent and fire a weapon.

In Australia, the technique is not commonly known as “Australian”, or even “rappelling”; instead the term “abseiling” is more commonly used and the technique is referred to as “Geneva” style.

Short description; you can rappel while managing a weapon.


Trained with some great guys.  Here is a ragged photo of some event or another with my buddies Burge and Smith…

 

 

 

 

 


US Army AirborneAirborne forces are military units, usually light infantry, set up to be moved by aircraft and “dropped” into battle, typically by parachute. Thus, they can be placed behind enemy lines, and have the capability to deploy almost anywhere with little warning. The formations are limited only by the number and size of their aircraft, so given enough capacity a huge force can appear “out of nowhere” in minutes, an action referred to as vertical envelopment.